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Which Is Better: Glass or Plastic Lenses?

Which Is Better: Glass or Plastic Lenses?

Finding the right pair of eyeglasses is essential to your comfort, but your lenses can contribute to how you feel in your new eyewear, too. Most lenses are either glass or plastic, and each of these offers different benefits. 

So, which is better: glass or plastic lenses?

Glass vs. Plastic Lenses

If you are wondering what the biggest difference between glass and plastic lenses is, it is how heavy they feel on your face and their ability to resist scuff marks. So, how do you know which is better: glass or plastic lenses? Let’s take a look at both options.

Glass Lenses: These lenses offer clearer vision than plastic lenses, and they can be made with thinner materials, making them more attractive on your face. They are also less likely to scratch due to the high-quality design.

However, there are some disadvantages of glass lenses, too. For instance, even though glass lenses are more shatterproof than they used to be, they are still prone to break upon impact. Therefore, children and others with active lifestyles should not wear glass lenses.

Glass lenses may also weigh your face down more than many types of plastic lenses. Due to the weight, you won’t be able to wear semi-rimless frames. This can limit your options if you prefer rimless eyewear. 

Plastic Lenses: When considering which is better between glass and plastic lenses, know that plastic lenses are lighter, making them easier to wear throughout the day. The light feeling also keeps you from needing to readjust your eyewear since it’s less likely to slip down your nose.

Plastic lenses are also a phenomenal type of eyeglass lens if you require durability. They are compatible with most frames, including thicker styles for athletes, and are available at an affordable price. 

The main reason people choose glass over plastic lenses is that they need better scratch resistance. However, you can add an anti-scratch coating to your plastic lenses and give them the same level of protection. This option, in addition to the durability of plastic lenses, is why many people prefer plastic over glass. 

Summary: Which is better: glass or plastic lenses? 

Glass vs. plastic lenses is a decision to make based on durability, weight, and scratch resistance. Here are some things to know about which is better between glass and plastic lenses: 

  • Glass lenses are less likely to scratch than plastic ones. However, you can add an anti-scratch coating to your plastic lenses.
  • Plastic is better for safety, and it’s lighter and more affordable than glass.

Whether you choose glass vs. plastic lenses depends on your needs. Spend some time thinking about the qualities that are most important to you in choosing your lenses, and the decision can be simple. 

 

Shop at For Eyes for your next pair of glasses

Show off your unique style and browse our wide variety of frames from your favorite brands for men, women and kids. Stop by your local For Eyes or order online at your convenience.

 

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